Social Science (859)

859-741. U.S. Citizenship. (1 Credit)

This course will prepare individuals who are planning to take the examination required by the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to become a naturalized United States citizen. The course provides a general introduction to significant dates, events, and documents in United States history, as well as identification of Americans who played an important role in establishing the country. The course also includes basic information on the development of the United States government and the rights and responsibilities of individuals in the United States. Go to the website "USCIS.gov" for forms, copies of the 100 questions and other information.

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859-745. Life Problem Solving Skills. (2 Credits)

Students will learn problem solving skills for managing their personal affairs in regard to self, family, leisure, community and job. The course will help students to assess their strengths and weaknesses and to gain an understanding of acceptable societal demands. Informational forums will be conducted throughout the semester for the students to access information on community resources.

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859-772. HSED 5.09 Civics - C. (1 Credit)

This classroom-based course explores the concepts of government and citizenship and meets the civics requirement for High School Civics.

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859-773. HSED 5.09 Civics - L. (1 Credit)

This lab-based course explores the concepts of government and citizenship and meets the civics requirement for High School Civics.

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859-774. HSED 5.09 Social Science - C. (2 Credits)

This classroom-based course explores four main topics related to the social sciences: United States History, World History, Economics, and Geographic regions of the world.

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859-777. HSED 5.09 Social Science - L. (2 Credits)

This lab-based course explores four main topics related to the social sciences: United States History, World History, Economics, and Geographic regions of the world.

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859-780. Intro to Social Sciences III. (2 Credits)

Students will achieve a basic understanding of six social science disciplines: psychology, sociology, anthropology, geography, political science, and economics. Students will be introduced to critical thinking and study skills needed to be successful in learning the social sciences. The con- tent and format will offer students a hands-on experience that fully engages them in the learning process. Emphasis is placed on three essential areas: establishing relevance, developing critical thinking skills, and developing study skills. Upon completion, students will be more knowledgeable about the nature of social sciences, more skilled in think- ing systematically and critically, and empowered to become concerned and involved citizens of the 21st century.

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859-782. Consumer Economics. (2 Credits)

This individualized adult high school credit course addresses the economy, decision making, financial management, and resource management. Throughout the course, consumer protection, laws and regulations, redress mechanisms, and the responsibilities of individuals in the American economic system are covered through textbook reading, workbook assignments, and projects.

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859-783. Civics. (2 Credits)

A comprehensive secondary level course based on the principles and practices of constitutional democracy in the United States. Competencies addressed include the institutions of government, the rights and responsibilities of citizens, and the political participation of individuals and groups under the Constitution. Students enrolled in Civics at Work will be challenged to apply core concepts to current and basic public issues and problems pertaining to ongoing tensions in a constitutional democracy. Students will also be exposed to skills of civic participation that involve monitoring and influencing politics and government.

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859-783A. Civics. (1 Credit)

A comprehensive secondary level course based on the principles and practices of constitutional democracy in the United States. Competencies addressed include the institutions of government, the rights and responsibilities of citizens, and the political participation of individuals and groups under the Constitution. Students enrolled in Civics will be challenged to apply core concepts to current and basic public issues and problems pertaining to ongoing tensions in a constitutional democracy. Students will also be exposed to skills of civic participation that involve monitoring and influencing politics and government.

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