Machine Shop (420)

420-120. Machine Tool/Fabrication. (2 Credits)

This course is designed to provide fabrication students with knowledge and applications of machine tool safety, processes, operation, and cutting conditions. The student will be required to produce a number of acceptable piece parts from standard blueprints.

Credit for prior learning available

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420-126. Machine Tool Theory. (1 Credit)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the practical theory related to machining processes and machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders, saws, and milling machines. There will also be emphasis on shop safety, cutting tools, cutting conditions, and precision and semi-precision measurement.

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420-128. Fixturing for Machining. (1 Credit)

This course is designed to introduce the student to the practical concepts of work holding methods for machining operations. Production fixtures and other work holding methods for various manufacturing operations including manual drilling, turning, milling and grinding along with CNC machining will be addressed. Locating, supporting and clamping principles in addition to Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) will be emphasized.

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420-160. Manufacturing Processes - Cold. (2 Credits)

Get an introduction to manufacturing methods and the progression a part follows from a piece of raw stock to its finished product.

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420-186. CNC Machining Ctr Programming. (2 Credits)

Develop the skills needed to program, set up and operate a CNC vertical machining center. Use blueprint interpretation and math skills to select tooling, determine a workholding method, and write a CNC program to completely machine a part per print. Learn to alter, insert and delete portions of existing programs in order to maintain control of part integrity.

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420-315. Contemporary Manufacturing. (1 Credit)

Explore current and future manufacturing processes, and apply the discussion topics to specific manufacturing applications.

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420-316. CNC Machining Center Operation. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of CNC. Students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC vertical machining center. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to CNC, G and M codes, basic programming format, speeds and feeds, tool offsets, and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to correctly select tooling, and determine workholding method.

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420-317. CNC Turning Center Operation. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of CNC. Students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC turning center. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to CNC, G and M codes, basic programming format, speeds and feeds, tool offsets, and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to correctly select tooling, and determine workholding method.

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420-320. Machine Tool Operation 1. (4 Credits)

Learn entry-level skills on basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders, and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in industrial situations.

Prerequisites: (420-326 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C- or 420-126 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C-)

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420-320A. Machine Tool Operation 1A. (2 Credits)

Learn entry-level skills on basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in industrial situations.

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420-320B. Machine Tool Operation 1B. (2 Credits)

Continue to develop the skills related to using basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders, and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in industrial situations.

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420-321. Machine Tool Operation 2. (4 Credits)

Enhance ability to use basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders, and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in industrial situations.

Prerequisites: 420-320 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C- and (420-126 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C- or 420-326 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C-)

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420-321A. Manufacturing Bootcamp. (1.25 Credits)

Students will be exposed to entry-level skills on safe operation of the manual lathe, manual mill, CNC machining center and CNC turning center. Use of precision measurig tools will also be emphasized.

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420-323. Machine Tool Operation III. (4 Credits)

Hone the skills related to using basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders, and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in industrial situations.

Prerequisites: (420-321 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C- and 420-320 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C-)

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420-324. Machine Tool Operation IV. (4 Credits)

Master the entry-level skills needed to use basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders, and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to tolerances commonly found in industrial situations.

Prerequisites: (420-323 (may be taken concurrently) with a minimum grade of C-)

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420-326. Machine Tool Theory I. (1 Credit)

Become familiar with basic theory related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

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420-328. Machine Tool Theory II. (1 Credit)

Increase knowledge of the theory related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

Prerequisites: (420-326 with a minimum grade of C-)

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420-330. Industrial Blueprint Reading I. (2 Credits)

Learn universally applicable techniques for interpreting all mechanical and industrial drawings through the study of drawing standards, abbreviations, basic rules for dimensioning, and various types of sectional views. Become familiar with geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.

Credit for prior learning available

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420-330A. Geometric Dim and Tol. (0.35 Credits)

Students will learn and apply principles related to Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing.

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420-331. Indust Blueprint Rd II. (2 Credits)

Explore advanced concepts related to accessing information relative to manufacturing. Use several computer applications to access drawing information and to create drawings. Complete worksheets with questions covering molds, dies, fixtures, and other workholding applications.

Prerequisites: (420-330 with a minimum grade of C- or 421-350 with a minimum grade of C-)

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420-336. CNC Machining Center Operation. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of CNC. Students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC vertical machining center. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to CNC, G and M codes, basic programming format, speeds and feeds, tool offsets, and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to correctly select tooling, and determine workholding method.

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420-337. CNC Turning Center Operation. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of CNC. Students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC turning center. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to CNC, G and M codes, basic programming format, speeds and feeds, tool offsets, and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to correctly select tooling and determine workholding method.

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420-366. CNC Machining Center Operation. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of CNC. Students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC vertical machining center. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to CNC, G and M codes, basic programming format, speeds and feeds, tool offsets, and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to correctly select tooling, and determine workholding method.

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420-367. CNC Turning Center Operation. (2 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of CNC. Students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC turning center. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to CNC, G and M codes, basic programming format, speeds and feeds, tool offsets, and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to correctly select tooling and determine workholding method.

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420-386. CNC Machining Center. (2 Credits)

Develop the skills needed to program, set up and operate a CNC vertical machining center. Use blueprint interpretation and math skills to select tooling, determine a workholding method, and write a CNC program to completely machine a part. Learn to alter, insert and delete portions of existing programs in order to maintain control of parts produced.

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420-387. CNC Turning Center. (2 Credits)

Develop the skills needed to program, set up, and operate a CNC turning center. Use blueprint and math skills to select tooling, determine a method of workholding, and write a CNC program to completely machine a part. Learn to modify existing programs and offsets to maintain dimensional control.

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420-388. Computer Assist Prog/CNC. (2 Credits)

Learn to harness an off-line computer-assisted CNC programming system to create geometry, post process, and download to the machine tool. It is recommended that students have a good understanding of math and blueprint interpretation.

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420-399. Wire EDM Fundamentals. (1 Credit)

Learn to use manual CNC programming to operate a wire electrical discharge machine (EDM). Study the basic programming related to the operation and set-up of a Mitsubishi Wire EDM.

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420-410. Introduction to Casting. (0.9 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of casting. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to casting processes, components of a casting and common foundry terms. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will also be discussed.

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420-413. Machine Tool Applications 1A. (7.6 Credits)

Learn entry-level skills on basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in industrial situations.

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420-413A. Machine Tool Applicatns-40Hrs. (4.4 Credits)

Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in manufacturing situations. Learn entry-level skills on basic machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Also learn how to use engineering drawings and how to make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages and the optical comparator.

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420-414. Machine Tool Application 1B. (7.6 Credits)

Learn entry-level skills on basic machine tools, including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Produce parts from engineering drawings, and make measurements using inspection tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages and the optical comparator. Develop the machine operating skills needed to produce parts to the tolerances commonly found in industrial situations. This course is a continuation of Machine Tool Application 1A.

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420-421. Industrial Blueprint Reading. (1.8 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Industrial Blueprint Reading.

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420-421A. Geometric Dim & Toleranc GD&T. (1.4 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerencing.

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420-424. CNC for Building Futures. (4 Credits)

Learn the fundamentals of CNC and develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC vertical machining center and turning center. Get introduced to CNC, G and M codes, basic programming format, speeds and feeds, tool offsets and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to correctly select tooling and determine workholding method.

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420-424A. CNC for Building Futures. (0.4 Credits)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of CNC. Students will operate a CNC vertical machining center and a turning center. Topics that will be covered include: introduction to CNC, G and M codes, and the basic features of CNC control panels. Blueprint interpretation and math skills will be used to evaluate finished pieceparts.

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420-426. Basic Measurement/Inspection. (1.8 Credits)

Total Quality Plastics students will learn and apply basic blueprint reading, measurement and quality control skills.

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420-430A. Industrial Blueprint Reading. (1.2 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Industrial Blueprint Reading.

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420-430B. Geometric Dim & Tol (GD&T). (0.9 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts, tools and measurement devices of Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing.

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420-430C. Geometric Dim & Toler (GD&T). (1.1 Credits)

Learn theoretical concepts of GD&T and the knowledge required to interpret GD&T feature control frames relative to current industry standards.

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420-432. Metrology and Math. (0.6 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of metrology and math for manufacturing.

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420-437. Machining. (0.9 Credits)

Participants will gain and develop the skills needed for the safe, efficient operation of machines located on a shop floor.

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420-450. Applied Math for Machining. (2.7 Credits)

Explore the topics of applied arithmetic and algebra. Study concepts related to measurement, fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion.

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420-451. Applied Math Industrial Appl. (1.8 Credits)

Learn entry-level skills by exploring the topics of applied math in an industrial setting. Study concepts related to measurement, fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion.

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420-451A. Industrial Math. (0.4 Credits)

Learn fundamentals of applied math related to measurements, fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion in an industrial setting.

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420-471A. Industrial Blueprint Reading. (0.8 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Industrial Blueprint Reading.

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420-471B. Industrial Blueprint Reading. (0.5 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Industrial Blueprint Reading.

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420-471E. Metrology. (0.4 Credits)

Basic introduction and application of precision measuring tools.

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420-471F. Industrial Blueprint Reading. (0.3 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Industrial Blueprint Reading.

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420-474. Basic Blueprint Reading. (2.3 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Industrial Blueprint Reading.

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420-474A. Blueprint Reading. (1.8 Credits)

Learn the theoretical concepts of Blueprint Reading, inspection and measurement.

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420-486. Manufacturing Bootcamp. (8.8 Credits)

This course is designed to give the student exposure to Manufacturing operations in an accelerated format. Topics covered will included CNC turning, blueprint reading, and math skills for manufacturing operations.

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420-486A. CNC Turning Ctr Operatns-35Hrs. (3.9 Credits)

In this course students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC turning center.

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420-487B. CNC Machining Operations-35Hrs. (3.9 Credits)

In this course students will learn the fundamentals of CNC. Students will develop the skills necessary to set up and operate a CNC vertical machining center.

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420-487C. CNC G-Code Programming. (0.7 Credits)

Learn tools and techniques to program a CNC machining center at G code level.

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420-488. Computer Assisted Programming. (5.4 Credits)

In this course the student will be exposed to 2-1/2 axis CAD programming software. The student will be instructed in part geometry creation, importation of solid models and editing. After a solid foundation of geometric relationships has been established the student will be required to tool-path several parts to acceptable machining practices. Programming platforms will be 3 Axis Machining Centers and 2 Axis Turning Centers.

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420-504. Safety Machine Tool Apprentice. (0.5 Credits)

Examine safe work practices for machinists, tool and die makers and related trades. Apprentices will explore industrial safety standards; personal protective equipment; machine guards and protective devices; and chemical safety, and more. Course relates 5S concepts to safe work practices and trade work processes.

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420-505. OSHA Machine Trade Apprentices. (0.5 Credits)

Learn about industrial safety concepts and ensuring safe work practices. Topics include OSHA, Lock out/Tag out, Personal Protective Equipment, Hazardous Communication, Electrical Safety, Industrial Hygiene, Machine Guarding, Fall Protection and Permit-Required Confined Spaces.

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420-512. Industrial Manufacturing 1. (3 Credits)

The first semester of related instruction includes an orientation to the trade and manufacturing, then followed by the MSSC safety module, MSSC quality module, OSHA 10 certification, blueprint reading, visual inspection, measurement, and first aid & CPR training. Manufacturing concepts will be introduced and applied in a variety of industrial settings.

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420-513. Industrial Manufacturing 2. (3 Credits)

The second semester of related instruction includes the MSSC manufacturing processes and production and maintenance awareness modules, along with communication, lean manufacturing, problem solving, and frontline leadership. Manufacturing related concepts will be applied to a variety of industrial settings. The course wraps-up with an examination of emerging trends and technologies, and future directions for manufacturing.

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420-514. Mathematics for Machine Trades. (1 Credit)

This course provides applied mathematics instruction from a review of basic arithmetic; basic algebra; applications, based on geometry; right triangle trigonometry, oblique angle trigonometry and compound angles. U.S. and metric measurement systems will be introduced. The course is recommended for first semester.

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420-515. Communications for Apprentices. (1 Credit)

The course introduces the apprentice to basic communication concepts relating to the workplace. It is designed specifically for the apprentice to acquire the necessary skills of giving instructions, writing a technical memo, and explaining a technical process. Throughout the course the apprentice will brainstorm, write, edit, revise, and use one-on-one communication delivery in a small group. The course combines lecture and hands-on activities utilizing information which the apprentice brings from the workplace.

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420-520. Metals Trade Theory I. (3 Credits)

Become familiar with basic theory related to topics such as in machining, blueprint reading, metallurgy, foundry, measurement, and safety in order to establish a solid foundation on which more specialized units - such as plastic mold making, stamping dies, CNC machining, and jig and fixture design - can be built.

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420-520A. Engineer Drawings Apprentices. (1 Credit)

In this course the apprentice will learn universally applicable techniques for interpreting mechanical and industrial drawings through the study of drawing standards, abbreviations, basic rules for dimensioning, and various views.

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420-520B. Machine Process 1 Apprentice. (1 Credit)

In this course the apprentice will learn about turning and grinding machines, machine operation and applications. There will also be emphasis on tooling, fixturing, setup, and cutting conditions.

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420-520C. Mach Tool Theory 1 Apprentices. (1 Credit)

In this course the apprentice will learn Mechanical Hardware and Metrology. The instruction will focus on various standard and non-traditional mechanical hardware and its applications. There will also be instruction in units of measurement, measuring tools, measuring tool application, precision and semi-precision measurement.

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420-521. Metals Trade Theory II. (3 Credits)

Explore topics including welding, milling machines, mechanical motions, electrical principles, layout, drill press, grinding, boring bar, jig boring, shapers, and planers.

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420-521A. GD&T Apprentices. (1 Credit)

In this course the apprentice will learn universally applicable techniques for interpreting geometric dimensioning and tolerancing.

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420-521B. Mach Proc 2 for Apprentices. (1 Credit)

In this course the apprentice will learn about milling and cutoff machines, machine operation and applications. There will also be emphasis on tooling, fixturing, setup, and cutting conditions.

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420-521C. Fixturing for Apprentices. (1 Credit)

This course is designed to introduce the apprentice to the practical concepts of work holding methods for machining operations. Production fixtures and other work holding methods for various manufacturing operations including manual drilling, turning, milling and grinding along with CNC machining will be addressed. Locating, supporting and clamping principles in addition to Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing (GD&T) will be emphasized.

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420-525. Machinist Theory I. (3.5 Credits)

Become knowledgeable about horizontal and vertical turret lathes, screw machines, basic and advanced numerical control machinery, programming, and jig fixture application. Solve numerical control machining problems, draw up the solutions, and present an oral report on the problems.

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420-525A. Comp Assist Machine Apprentice. (1.75 Credits)

In this course the machinist apprentice will be exposed to 2-1/2 axis CAD programming software. The apprentice will be instructed in part geometry creation and editing. After a solid foundation of geometric relationships has been established the apprentice will be required to tool-path several parts to acceptable machining practices. Programming platforms will be 3 Axis Machining Centers and 2 Axis Turning Centers.

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420-525B. CNC Mach Ctr Machinist Appr. (1.75 Credits)

This course provides the skills needed to program, set-up, and operate a CNC vertical machining center. The apprentice will utilize blueprint interpretation and math skills to select tooling, determine a work-holding method, and write CNC programs to completely machine an acceptable piecepart. The apprentice will also insert, alter, and delete portions of existing programs in order to maintain control of the manufactured pieceparts.

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420-527. Machinist Theory II. (3.5 Credits)

Increase knowledge of horizontal and vertical turret lathes, screw machines, basic and advanced numerical control machinery, programming, and jig fixture applications. Solve numerical control machining problems, draw up the solutions, and present an oral report on the problems.

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420-527A. SolidWorks Machine Apprentice. (1.75 Credits)

Apprentices will learn basic part modeling, creating various configurations of a part, assembly modeling, editing models and assemblies, and generating detail part and assembly drawings.

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420-527B. CNC Turning Ctr Mach Appr. (1.75 Credits)

This course provides the skills needed to program, set-up, and operate a CNC turning center. The apprentice will utilize blueprint interpretation and math skills to select tooling, determine a work-holding method, modify offsets, and write CNC programs to completely turn an acceptable piecepart. The apprentice will also insert, alter, and delete portions of existing programs in order to maintain control of the manufactured pieceparts.

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420-540. NIMS Metals Trade Theory I. (4 Credits)

Become familiar with basic theory related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

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420-541. NIMS Metal Trade Application I. (3 Credits)

Become familiar with basic applications related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

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420-542. NIMS Metals Trade Theory II. (4 Credits)

Become familiar with theory related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

Prerequisites: 420-540 with a minimum grade of D-

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420-543. NIMS Metals Trade Applic II. (3 Credits)

Become familiar with applications related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

Prerequisites: 420-541 with a minimum grade of D-

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420-544. NIMS Machinist Theory I. (4 Credits)

Become familiar with theory related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

Prerequisites: 420-541 with a minimum grade of D-

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420-545. NIMS Machinist ApplicationsI. (3 Credits)

Become familiar with applications related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and optical comparator.

Prerequisites: 420-541 with a minimum grade of D-

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420-546. NIMS Machinist Theory 2. (4 Credits)

Become familiar with applications related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

Prerequisites: 420-543 with a minimum grade of C-

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420-548. NIMS Machinst Applications 1. (4 Credits)

Become familiar with applications related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

Prerequisites: 420-541 with a minimum grade of C-

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420-549. NIMS Machinst Applications 2. (4 Credits)

Become familiar with applications related to machine tools including lathes, drill presses, grinders and milling machines. Learn the theory of using measuring tools such as micrometers, height gages, verniers, thread gages, and the optical comparator.

Prerequisites: 420-541 with a minimum grade of C-

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420-781. STEM Acad Assist Manufacturing. (2.25 Credits)

Course specific tutoring will be provided to students enrolled in Manufacturing programs to assist them in successfully completing their coursework.

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